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A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]
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Parchment A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

Welcome new players and veterans alike. Have you ever came to the conclusion that your army just downright sucks? Are you bored of your generic men-with-guns, or as we like to call them, Gunerics? Likewise, are you tired of spending hour upon hour trying to get your army to look just right? Do they always come out boring or just downright silly? This tutorial will explain the fundamentals of a good army, and suggestions on how to make them.

What is an army?
An army is a collection of unique sprites formed under one banner to fight. The army can be anything, ranging from Beavers to cute little Orange Circles.
There can be different types of armies as well.

Medieval/Fantasy
This is your Swords and Bows type of army. Wooden and Brick structures, complimented with early era fighting and troops. Magic included.
Metal Chao's Goblins
Miro's Dwarfs

Modern
Where most armies fall under mostly being the Guneric. Using firearms and other modern weapons, this is the most used in terms of army types.
Sanzh's Union Army
Ned's New Roman Empire
Über's Red Army
DragonSpawn's Gunerican Army

Futuristic
A lot more high tech than the other two. These armies use lasers, photon cannons, and weapons we've never seen before in battle.
Sanzh's Travelers
Jager's Armies
Bikkel's Balls
Anything by Olo
PPW
A subcategory for Futuristic where players create a smallish spaceship army set for actual space battles.
Nevindar's thread has many examples

Infection
This is probably the least used army type. The Infection army literally infects the map over time, changing its appearance. This army usually has a main birther which spawns both units and spreads its infection.
Mother Nature
Agent's Sludge
Limewire's Squishlings

An Army of One
Very rarely used and very hard to do it right. This army uses only one unit to fight. This typically isn't used due to balance reasons and is usually shunned in our community. If you can find a way to make it work, more power to you.
The World Builder

All armies linked are owned by their original creators. Please do not use them without the owners consent.


What makes a good army?
This is probably very subjective, so take it with a grain of salt. A good army can have well made sprites, a decent backstory, and cool effects. But what makes a truly good army is its style, how it's played with or against in matches, and if it can be remembered. Now while good art, story, and effects add to the quality of an army, by no means should you lean on just those things. Some of the most memorable and greatest armies don't have the best art, but their style and match quality is top notch. Metal Chao's Goblins and SuperChocobo's Cocos are arguably up there when it comes to great armies.

How can I make my army unique?
The most obvious answer is to something that no one has done before. I understand that this is difficult to achieve because I think I can safely say that we've reached a point where originality is pretty hard to come by. There are other ways to make an army unique though! You could have the most boring Gunerics anyone has ever seen, but the mechanics and how they're played could be something no one has seen, and that alone can make an army unique.
For instance, I'll be using an example of an army I'm currently in the process of creating. DnD monsters! Ohh....but that's not very original. So how do I make stand out from the other armies? Well, since it's DnD, I've decided to add a dice mechanic to my army. What they do and how well they perform is based entirely on the roll of a dice. That little quirk that this army has is enough to get some attention. Of course, how well I sprite them and the match quality adds to their standing.
So, think of something new and fun you can bring to the table. The army itself doesn't have to be revolutionary, but keep in mind all the possibilities you can add to them that could make them revolutionary.
Another example is just the style of the army. The look and feel of how they're played out. If you get a good art direction incorporated in your army then it's bound to be remembered and considered a "good" army.

(Excerpt added by Seventeenth Squid)
----
To make your army really stand out and be remembered, as well as be fun to sprite and write turns for, you need something with a lot of depth. Now, of course, depth can be created through a lot of different means:

Characters: If your army allows for a lot of characterization, you can make them a lot more interesting. Consider how different units can interact with each other as well as with the other players.
Backstory: This means the history and story behind your army; it may be readily apparent or it maybe slowly revealed over the course of a match. It can be very interesting to allow small amounts of backstory to trickle into your matches, slowly revealing the whole thing over the course of a match or even several matches.
Gameplay: I say gameplay without really meaning "gameplay" in the sense of most video games. It's more about how the mechanics you've created for your army allow you to interact with your enemies. If your army just runs around taking potshots at people from across the map, you'll find yourself rapidly getting bored with the army. If your army relies on teleporting into close combat and cracking heads, you're going to have a lot more fun both drawing turns and thinking of badass things to add to your army. Make your gameplay interesting and fun.

I think were a lot of people run into problems with army creation is in their original concept. There's sort of an idea floating around PW that if your army has humans with guns, it's automatically boring. I think that almost any concept can be very interesting and entertaining if done right: for instance, your army of men with guns could easily have some pretty in-depth character interaction because human characters are so easy to relate to. Its gameplay could be equally interesting if you gave them a bit of a twist, like a few exotic weapons and machines.

When designing an interesting army, always try to leave room for expansion. An army based on a single-match gimmick can definitely be cool and fun, but once that match is over the army is essentially useless. Remember, though, that you can connect matches: reference characters or encounters from past matches in your later ones. A good example of this would be the re-appearance of the Steam Badger in Steameh Treats or the Grand Knight in Chocobo vs. Chao. Both are characters from earlier matches who some members remember fondly, therefore adding some call-backs and nostalgia to the matches. If I can be excused a bit of self-gratification I would use the example of including the Churnworms as a story element in my Piercing the Veil turns: a lot of members fondly remember Something Below from the old forum (even though my spriting that match was actually pretty abysmal looking back on it) so adding elements from the Churnworms to the army makes it a lot more memorable than it might otherwise be.

In the end, always remember that the purpose of your army is to tell a story. This doesn't mean you need your army to have some crazy giant backstory written in painstaking detail; a funny, entertaining and action-packed story is just as good as a huge, dramatic character-filled story. Think about what themes you want your army to focus on and design it accordingly. Above all, remember to make your army cool. Make something that you will have fun writing and other people will enjoy reading and watching.
----

How do I make my army?
So you've figured out what you want to make. You know the mechanics, what they are, and a good idea of how they'll look. So where in the world do you begin?

The Tools
Microsoft Paint.
Photoshop
Gimp
Anything that has a zoom feature and a pencil tool that doesn't anti-alias.

Getting Started
You got your medium, now you're ready to begin.
The first thing you want to do is get some reference. It's a little difficult to get what you want with your own mind in sprite form, or how a certain part of a vehicle looks. No ones going to call you out on using reference. Reference is a good thing, blatantly copying someone's sprites isn't.
This Thread has tons of links to concept art, schematics, and other things to suit your needs for reference.
Alternatively, Deviantart.com and google.com are pretty good too.

Since I'm making sprites based off the Monster Manual in DnD 4e, I've got all the reference I need. For this tutorial, I'll be using this guy as my reference.
[Image: c7ovUIj.png]
Okay, sounds easy enough. Where do I start?

Well, I'll need to know how big to make him. You don't want to make a unit too large in PW, they'll look weird and might be too large for most levels. Too small and you've just made yourself a tiny army. The average size of a normal humanoid sprite is about 25 px. Obviously this will vary from person to person.


Now it says in the Monster Manual that Kololds are small creatures, but we'll just ignore that and make them average PW height. Once we understand how big to make our creation we'll actually begin the process of Spritenization.
This is the moment in which most people set themselves up for anger and frustration. Lot's of people will want to dive right into the project head first without sampling the waters. People want to get everything done right then and there. This is not a good way to go for amateur artists.
There's a phrase that is used in a lot of different scenarios. It's called, K.I.S.S.
Keep it Simple Stupid.
This can apply to anything, even spriting. So lets keep it simple, stupid.


[Image: V4nKvoS.png]
(Random guy used as size reference)
Coloring isn't important on this stage. Getting your general shape and sense of what you're making is.
-Block in shapes, get the general idea of the sprite down first.
KEEP IT SIMPLE!
-Get the silhouette done first so you know what the shape of it will look like. This is where you can adjust the shape, size, and whatever else.
-Use alternate colors so you know where everything is and don't get confused.
-It is also a good idea to keep a set of body parts separate for easy access when the time comes.

Now that I've got a good grasp on what this guy will look like, I begin to flesh out the body. This is a good time to change some of the anatomy around and adjust small things around.

If you notice that you've fucked up, you won't have to worry because you've KEPT IT SIMPLE. This allows to change things quickly and efficiently. Once you're happy with how it looks, you can start deciding what colors you're going to use.


[Image: I9XkX1o.png]
The OC shows that he has lots of grayish green colors. So I chose the default green and played around with the saturation levels until it looked right. Things aren't naturally very high in saturation. You shouldn't really have neon greens or reds in your design. It looks weird and it hurts your eyes. Try to keep colors under control.


[Image: SEk7bSI.png]
These are the main colors I'm using for the dude. When you're dealing with shading, you typically want 3-5 different colors. Less than three and you got some weird cartoony shit going on, more than 5 and it starts to get complicated. Of course this doesn't mean you can't apply more colors, but for sprites this small you typically want to use less colors. From your base color is where you get your highlights and shades. Typically I go in a diagonal when choosing my colors. This is a classic art technique where when things get darker they don't really become black, instead, they become cooler colors. Dark purple being the shadows, and light yellow being a highlight.


[Image: H6TQ7gR.png]
You can see how I transition towards purple as my colors get darker, and towards yellow as it gets lighter.


[Image: 71Sm5J6.png]
Obviously your first few choices of color may not be the ones you want. That's okay, keep experimenting. At this point I think we can start to render it. Rendering is the process of bringing out the details and basically finalizing your work. Finishing the shades and highlights and basically making it look pretty. Since PW sprites are small, we don't have a lot of room for detail. Don't try to fit every little detail into your sprite or it will look messy. It's okay to generalize things, keep it relatively simple but make sure you and the audience knows what it is.


[Image: HgqrJeX.png]
Remember how we made each limb a different color? Well that helps us color in where general shading will be. Usually the general consensus is that the sun is located to the top left. I don't know why, but that's basically the unspoken rule among this community. I make the limbs that are out and facing the sun more lighter than the ones that aren't. For now, this is good, we'll keep rendering.


[Image: 5JN6p9P.png]
The final processes of rendering is really dependent on your art skills. You don't need to have masters in fine art, but you should at least have a good understanding of shapes, shading techniques, color theory, and anything else that you think would help.


[Image: R08B6PI.png]
And there we have it.
A PWer's work is never done. Plop that baby into the Work in progress Thread and see what other people think of it. There will be criticism and it will hurt. Trust me, I know. Don't feel discouraged though, take what people say and use it to improve.  I'm almost 100% sure that I'll be changing this guy a lot based on my own ideas and the suggestions of others. Never really set anything in stone, you'll be constantly improving things.


[Image: cidOsvZ.png]
Keep your public viewing sprite sheet clean and organized. Make it easy for people to see what you have and keep the clutter to a minimum.

Often use a colored background to set your sprites in. Having a white backgrounds makes things look deceptive, and strains your eyes. Use grays and darker colors, maybe the compliment of the main color you used so your sprite stands out. It also helps your peers when you make your own army thread or want advice in the WIP thread.



"What about poses?"
I have this thing about pre-drawing poses. Personally I think it's a waste of time. It's almost like taking an explosion from a template and plopping down in a match. Sure it might serve its purpose once or twice, but honestly, putting in the extra effort to make something unique each time will give you respect and increase your overall quality on things. Instead, make your poses on the spot during matches. Have your men react to the things around them. I'm okay with a normal walking pose or something, but other than that not so much.


Things to Remember
-Don't spend too long on one sprite. Taking a break and coming back to see what it looks like will help you decide what looks good and what doesn't.
-Ask for help! Your friends have good ideas too, ask them for help if you're stuck or to just get their opinion.
-KEEP IT SIMPLE At least at first, don't start off with detailing. Get the basic forms down, then work from there.
-Save in PNG! Oh Christ this should be a given, but always make sure that little "Save As" is set for PNG, otherwise you could really screw up all that hard work you did.

Where do I go from here?
Add more to your army. You want a decent selection. Once you've gotten all the C&C you need, make an army thread. Add fluff if you want and watch the praise stack up! When you're done with that, look for a match and start playing!
I suggest looking at Chocobo's How to Match guide.
And when you're done looking at that, check out my other guide on The Art of Effects!
(Currently down for maintenance)

If there is anything that I haven't covered about armies that you would like to see, please inform me. Questions, comments, hate mail, and death threats are welcome too.

TL;DR: There really isn't a tl;dr for something like this. Please do take the time to read it.
(This post was last modified: 02-24-2014 01:15 PM by Jacquerel.)
02-12-2012 06:13 AM
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Jafhar Offline
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

Quote:If there is anything that I haven't covered about armies that you would like to see, please inform me. Questions, comments, hate mail, and death threats are welcome too.
Awesome, the only thing that would be needed is a tiny bit on shading just after the saturation colour scale thing.

Also, I will carve you into your sprite and hang you from the roof by the skin on your back and use you as a reference to redo that sprite if you don't include shading. <3

SPRITE FASTER, COLOUR HARDER, PARTICLE OSCILLATE WITH AGILITY.
02-12-2012 07:12 AM
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

Updated with Jafhar's request.
02-12-2012 07:48 AM
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Optimus Lime Offline
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

Awesome, finally a tutorial! We've been waiting for ages *glances at Photocopier*.

[center]The being known as &quot;Optimus Lime&quot; or, simply, &quot;Optimus&quot;[/center]<br />[center]When life gives you lemons, squeeze them in someone else's eye.[/center]
02-12-2012 01:42 PM
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SuperChocobo Offline
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

We needed something like this, my only complaint really is that you could have maybe picked a simpler concept/idea as an example sprite.
02-12-2012 02:01 PM
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Agent10361 Offline
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

One of my armies were featured! Even if it isn't the full one Plbbbfft
02-12-2012 02:40 PM
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Rainbows! Offline
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

Might want to add Steampunk to the army type list.

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02-12-2012 03:18 PM
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SuperChocobo Offline
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

Steampunk is pretty much modern with different looks, doesn't really need its own type.
02-12-2012 04:38 PM
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Mouse Offline
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

(02-12-2012 02:01 PM)SuperChocobo link Wrote:  We needed something like this, my only complaint really is that you could have maybe picked a simpler concept/idea as an example sprite.

I thought about that as I was making this. Still though, it gets its point across.
02-12-2012 11:29 PM
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Seventeenth Squid Offline
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

I'd like to throw in a few words about army concepts and planning a good army.

To make your army really stand out and be remembered, as well as be fun to sprite and write turns for, you need something with a lot of depth. Now, of course, depth can be created through a lot of different means:

Characters: If your army allows for a lot of characterization, you can make them a lot more interesting. Consider how different units can interact with each other as well as with the other players.
Backstory: This means the history and story behind your army; it may be readily apparent or it maybe slowly revealed over the course of a match. It can be very interesting to allow small amounts of backstory to trickle into your matches, slowly revealing the whole thing over the course of a match or even several matches.
Gameplay: I say gameplay without really meaning "gameplay" in the sense of most video games. It's more about how the mechanics you've created for your army allow you to interact with your enemies. If your army just runs around taking potshots at people from across the map, you'll find yourself rapidly getting bored with the army. If your army relies on teleporting into close combat and cracking heads, you're going to have a lot more fun both drawing turns and thinking of badass things to add to your army. Make your gameplay interesting and fun.

I think were a lot of people run into problems with army creation is in their original concept. There's sort of an idea floating around PW that if your army has humans with guns, it's automatically boring. I think that almost any concept can be very interesting and entertaining if done right: for instance, your army of men with guns could easily have some pretty in-depth character interaction because human characters are so easy to relate to. Its gameplay could be equally interesting if you gave them a bit of a twist, like a few exotic weapons and machines.

When designing an interesting army, always try to leave room for expansion. An army based on a single-match gimmick can definitely be cool and fun, but once that match is over the army is essentially useless. Remember, though, that you can connect matches: reference characters or encounters from past matches in your later ones. A good example of this would be the re-appearance of the Steam Badger in Steameh Treats or the Grand Knight in Chocobo vs. Chao. Both are characters from earlier matches who some members remember fondly, therefore adding some call-backs and nostalgia to the matches. If I can be excused a bit of self-gratification I would use the example of including the Churnworms as a story element in my Piercing the Veil turns: a lot of members fondly remember Something Below from the old forum (even though my spriting that match was actually pretty abysmal looking back on it) so adding elements from the Churnworms to the army makes it a lot more memorable than it might otherwise be.

In the end, always remember that the purpose of your army is to tell a story. This doesn't mean you need your army to have some crazy giant backstory written in painstaking detail; a funny, entertaining and action-packed story is just as good as a huge, dramatic character-filled story. Think about what themes you want your army to focus on and design it accordingly. Above all, remember to make your army cool. Make something that you will have fun writing and other people will enjoy reading and watching.
02-12-2012 11:59 PM
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DragonSpawn Offline
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

Aw, come on, an entire army dedicated to the portmanteau and I don't get some link action? :v:

Sarcasm and self promotion aside, definitely a good tutorial, should hopefully inspire some people to move on to more interesting types of armies!
(I, however, shall carry on shamelessly!)

[Image: aX7yx.png]
02-13-2012 01:45 AM
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Zizou Offline
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

You got the height scale measurements wrong!

[Image: 9ca1d8f128.png]

THis is fixed :P
08-14-2012 04:57 PM
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

no
08-15-2012 06:06 AM
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

(08-15-2012 06:06 AM)Toothpick link Wrote:  no

what no?

EDIT: oh right, stupid me, this is the right version:
[Image: 17206f6a75.png]
(This post was last modified: 08-15-2012 08:10 AM by Zizou.)
08-15-2012 08:07 AM
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Jafhar Offline
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

That was actually my fault lol.

Spoiler :
After all, that is my edit that a bunch of people took to using instead of the correct version posted slightly earlier.

SPRITE FASTER, COLOUR HARDER, PARTICLE OSCILLATE WITH AGILITY.
08-15-2012 08:25 AM
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Zizou Offline
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

Also a hint mouse, write that you should use a light gray or cyan background so the colours aren't too bright or too dark :)
08-16-2012 06:32 PM
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

I'm planning to add a sort of tips or general-rule-of-thumbs list and change things around, mainly taking Choco's request and having a simplify model to use. Your suggestion is definitely on that list.
08-17-2012 09:48 AM
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Zizou Offline
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

Oh jesus I think that scale is wrong too D:

I used a frickin pixel measuring tool and THIS is correct

[Image: 6bb6d35359.png]
08-21-2012 04:58 PM
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

Update:
Reworded some things.
Redid the sprite example.
Added some tidbits.

[8-30]
Added a sidenote for PPW armies.
(This post was last modified: 08-30-2012 11:00 PM by Mouse.)
08-21-2012 06:39 PM
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

I hope someone backed up the images for this, and the other tutorials.

[Image: fb84349cc8.png]
09-11-2013 08:04 PM
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Re: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

Reuploaded the images and revised some wording. If anyone happens to have my "Art of Effects" pictures please let me know. If not I'll just redo all of it.
11-09-2013 11:23 AM
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Propman Offline
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RE: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

Looking around at the forums a bit, a think that there's enough armies to fit another category (assuming this is still a thing):

Early Modern/Industrial
Possibly the most varied type of army after Futuristic, Early Modern armies have the aesthetic of forces from the 17th to 19th and early 20th century, generally defined by mixing guns with melee weapons, as well as having colorful uniforms. An EM can be equipped with anything ranging from muskets to rifles to magicians and tanks depending on which century or aesthetic it focuses itself on, with airships being the norm for an air force; two early modern armies can vary significantly in technology, with a low end army being closer to medieval while a higher end one might superficially resemble a modern force. Typically however, most EM armies tend to be weaker then their modern and futuristic counterparts when it comes to technology, though they usually have more units at their disposal, while also possessing unique technologies that can't easily be replicated in a pure modern army in the case of Steampunk forces, a major subcategory for EMs, or magic, in the case of more mystical EMs. A unique blend of unit types makes them unpredictable on the battlefield; A medieval army might decimate their mounted lancer corps, only to fall to their recently developed Gatling Guns, while a bunch of men with guns expecting an easy battle could find themselves on the receiving end of a castle-sized steam powered land battleship.

(I'd post links to examples, but my current typing device lacks a copy function.)
(This post was last modified: 01-23-2014 07:52 AM by Propman.)
01-23-2014 07:38 AM
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Chaotic Skies Offline
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RE: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

Can I just use someone elses army, because I want to start playing, and am terribly terrible at drawing/doing art?
02-14-2016 10:37 PM
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Trifon Offline
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RE: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

(02-14-2016 10:37 PM)Chaotic Skies Wrote:  Can I just use someone elses army, because I want to start playing, and am terribly terrible at drawing/doing art?

That's generally taboo in this community, I'd be happy to offer some of me armies but unfortunately I don't have any.

Most people don't care about whether or not your army is great or not, most people here started with pretty bad sprites. Hell, I started with sprites 30 pixels big and disproportionate and clunky, now I consider myself a fairly decent pixel artist (Don't look in the Offtopic Thread). Just try, is all.

Michael Rosen YTPs are still funny.
02-15-2016 01:28 AM
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RE: A Guide to Armies [Tutorial]

(02-14-2016 10:37 PM)Chaotic Skies Wrote:  Can I just use someone elses army, because I want to start playing, and am terribly terrible at drawing/doing art?
I could make you some; PM me what you want and I will try to make it. they would still be mostly crappy, but they should work out in the end...
02-15-2016 01:38 AM
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